Survivor

180px-survivor_borneo_logoWhen I hear the word “Survivor,” I think of the TV show.  Or people who lived through Hurricane Katrina.  Or someone who beat cancer. 

I’ve never thought of myself as a survivor.  But a book I’m reading is challenging me to think otherwise.

It’s called On the Threshold of Hope by Diane Mandt Langberg.  If you or someone you know has been the victim of sexual abuse, read this book.  I’ve read other books on the topic, but this one is well worth the tears it prompts.

“Survive comes from the Latin word supervivere. It literally means ‘to live above or beyond.’ To survive means to keep alive against the odds. It suggests the capacity for endurance.  A survivor, then, is one who has experienced something extraordinary and yet manages to keep on going…On one hand, to be a survivor is to rise above the difficulty, to move on in spite of the pain, to defy the odds. On the other hand, it means living a life that has been profoundly affected by an atrocity” (Langberg, 17).

Atrocity?  My marriage could easily be defined as one.  So could my mugging.  As could sexual harrassment.  And the list goes on…

I’ve endured much in my 27 years and lived to tell about it.  I guess that makes me a survivor.

At the end of the TV show, the sole survivor wins $1 million.  At the end of my life, my solitary desire is to hear, Well done, good and faithful servant.  That will make all the pain, all the endurance, all the atrocities worth it. 

Are you a survivor?

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~ by Serena on February 26, 2009.

5 Responses to “Survivor”

  1. I hadn’t heard of this one! I will definitely check it out! Thanks sweet thing!

  2. […] one of her own blog posts, Serena talks about a book that has helped her on her healing journey. Serena writes, “I’ve […]

  3. I am an incest survivor. I only recently found Amy’s blog. I just finished reading your 3-part story on Amy’s blog. Other survivors of domestic violence will greatly benefit from the sharing of your story. Yes, you are a survivor.

  4. […] Or was it that my ability to hope had been damaged somewhere along the way?  (Admittedly, as a survivor, one of my coping mechanisms became the words of Elphaba from Wicked, “Don’t wish, don’t […]

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